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'The playing is of a high order,' observed Early Music World when reviewing Labirinti Armonici's debut on Brilliant Classics (95718), with the Op.2 Sonatas of Francesco Antonio Bonporti: 'the overall effect is of a highly professional group at home with the repertoire. So few of Bonporti's works have been recorded to the highest standards; let us hope this is a start of a revival!' The revival hastens on with a third volume of Bonporti from the same performers, all practiced Italian musicians specializing in music of the 17th and 18th centuries and who began coming together under the Labirinti Armonici umbrella in 2006. Since then they have hosted many masterclasses in Baroque performance practice, based in the Trento region of northern Italy, as well as giving concerts across the region. Under the directorship of founder Andrea Ferroni, Labirinti Armonici has adopted the cause of Bonporti as a local hero. He was born in the city of Trento in 1672 and died in Padova in 1749, thus almost exactly overlapping with the more famous Cantor of Leipzig; in fact Bach probably knew Bonporti's music, and perhaps adopted the genre of keyboard 'Inventions' from him. Bonporti's own compositional model was clearly that of Corelli, with it's technically sophisticated writing for the violin, full of virtuoso touches and flourishes as well as imaginative harmony and lively part-writing. Nevertheless, his output remains under-explored even by modern ensembles, which makes this new recording an attractive acquisition for all devotees of the Italian Baroque.
'The playing is of a high order,' observed Early Music World when reviewing Labirinti Armonici's debut on Brilliant Classics (95718), with the Op.2 Sonatas of Francesco Antonio Bonporti: 'the overall effect is of a highly professional group at home with the repertoire. So few of Bonporti's works have been recorded to the highest standards; let us hope this is a start of a revival!' The revival hastens on with a third volume of Bonporti from the same performers, all practiced Italian musicians specializing in music of the 17th and 18th centuries and who began coming together under the Labirinti Armonici umbrella in 2006. Since then they have hosted many masterclasses in Baroque performance practice, based in the Trento region of northern Italy, as well as giving concerts across the region. Under the directorship of founder Andrea Ferroni, Labirinti Armonici has adopted the cause of Bonporti as a local hero. He was born in the city of Trento in 1672 and died in Padova in 1749, thus almost exactly overlapping with the more famous Cantor of Leipzig; in fact Bach probably knew Bonporti's music, and perhaps adopted the genre of keyboard 'Inventions' from him. Bonporti's own compositional model was clearly that of Corelli, with it's technically sophisticated writing for the violin, full of virtuoso touches and flourishes as well as imaginative harmony and lively part-writing. Nevertheless, his output remains under-explored even by modern ensembles, which makes this new recording an attractive acquisition for all devotees of the Italian Baroque.
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'The playing is of a high order,' observed Early Music World when reviewing Labirinti Armonici's debut on Brilliant Classics (95718), with the Op.2 Sonatas of Francesco Antonio Bonporti: 'the overall effect is of a highly professional group at home with the repertoire. So few of Bonporti's works have been recorded to the highest standards; let us hope this is a start of a revival!' The revival hastens on with a third volume of Bonporti from the same performers, all practiced Italian musicians specializing in music of the 17th and 18th centuries and who began coming together under the Labirinti Armonici umbrella in 2006. Since then they have hosted many masterclasses in Baroque performance practice, based in the Trento region of northern Italy, as well as giving concerts across the region. Under the directorship of founder Andrea Ferroni, Labirinti Armonici has adopted the cause of Bonporti as a local hero. He was born in the city of Trento in 1672 and died in Padova in 1749, thus almost exactly overlapping with the more famous Cantor of Leipzig; in fact Bach probably knew Bonporti's music, and perhaps adopted the genre of keyboard 'Inventions' from him. Bonporti's own compositional model was clearly that of Corelli, with it's technically sophisticated writing for the violin, full of virtuoso touches and flourishes as well as imaginative harmony and lively part-writing. Nevertheless, his output remains under-explored even by modern ensembles, which makes this new recording an attractive acquisition for all devotees of the Italian Baroque.
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